Official Records, Series 3, Volume IV, pages 839 to 841.
Dave
APPENDIX B.
COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT, FIRST ARMY CORPS,
November 12, 1863.
Capt. L. B. NORTON, 
Chief Signal Officer, Army of the Potomac:
It is with pleasure that I attest the great utility of the signal telegraph as used in this army
 under your direction. I recollect one instance where the line was more than twenty miles in length
 and where I transmitted messages by it with perfect success.
 Corps headquarters were at Guilford, and army headquarters at Fairfax at the time.
 The flags could not be used owing to dense woods and the want of positions, 
but the line worked like a charm. In my opinion it is of great benefit to the army as now conducted.
Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,
C. McCLURE, 
Capt. and Actg. Chief Commissary of Subsistence, First Corps.
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HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS,
November 13, 1863.
I have frequently used the field telegraph lines of the Signal Corps of this army and have noticed
 the remarkable rapidity with which they have been run out, and that they are skillfully worked.
 I regard them as a very important auxiliary to the equipment of the Signal Corps and of great value to the service.
JOHN SEDGWICK, 
Major-general.
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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
November 13, 1863.
Capt. L. B. NORTON, 
Chief Signal Officer:
DEAR SIR: I should be very sorry to see the field telegraph separated from the Signal Corps as, 
I understand from you, is now proposed. I would prefer the consolidation of the magneto field 
and signal telegraph all under one head, as being the plan most certain to render each most efficient.
Respectfully, yours,
GEO. G. MEADE, 
Major-General.
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HDQRS. FIRST ARMY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
November 13, 1863.
I take pleasure in saying that I am satisfied with the rapidity with which the telegraph lines run out 
by the Signal Corps of this army are established, and the skill displayed in operating them. 
I regard them as a valuable acquisition to the service, and important to the proper equipment of the Signal Corps.
JNO. C. ROBINSON, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding First Army Corps.

SIGNAL DEPT., HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
November 13, 1863.
Maj. Gen. G. K. WARREN, 
Commanding Second Army Corps:
GENERAL: I have the honor to apply for an expression of your opinion in regard to the rapidity 
with which the temporary field telegraph lines of the Signal Corps have been run out when required 
during the operations of this army, the success with which they have been worked, and whether they 
are not a valuable auxiliary to the proper equipment of the Signal Corps.
I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
L. B. NORTON, 
Captain and Chief Signal Officer, Army of the Potomac.
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HEADQUARTERS THIRD ARMY CORPS,
November 14, 1863.
Capt. L. B. NORTON, 
Chief Signal Officer, Army of the Potomac:
CAPTAIN: In reply to your communication of the 13th instant, requesting an expression of my opinion 
upon certain questions regarding the temporary field telegraph -lines of the Signal Corps, 
I am enabled to state, by personal observation, that for rapidity the lines have been run out 
to keep pace with every advance of the army, accompanying the head of column at Chancellorsville 
to the field of battle. It has always been ready for service night and day. That it should constitute 
a part of a military organization following the headquarters of the army and of every corps into their 
camps would seem to be unquestionable.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
WM. H. FRENCH, 
Major-General of Volunteers.
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HEADQUARTERS ARTILLERY RESERVE,
November 15, 1863.
I have seen and used the telegraph lines run by the Signal Corps of this army, and am satisfied with the 
rapidity with which they are established and the skill displayed in operating them. I regard them as a 
valuable acquisition to the service, and I believe them important to the proper equipment of the Signal Corps.
R. O. TYLER, 
Brigadier-General.
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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,
Camp Paoli Mills, November 16, 1863.
Capt. L. B. NORTON, 
Chief Signal Officer, Army of the Potomac:
CAPTAIN: I have received your letter of the 13th instant, and in reply desire to say that 
I regard the signal telegraph as an indispensable auxiliary to the operations of the army; 
that wherever established at my headquarters it has been successfully worked, and of very great 
benefit in the transmission of orders. The advantages are so apparent that it hardly requires 
any reasons to be given to make it a permanent portion of the equipage of an army.
I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,
GEO. SYKES, 
Major-General, Commanding.


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